Metal object in Reese's peanut butter cup sends 11-year-old to hospital

An 11-year-old girl was sent to hospital after consuming a Reese’s peanut butter cup Halloween candy that contained a “foreign metal object,” Waterloo Regional Police said in a news release Wednesday.

Police said they were “actively investigating” a report about “tampered Halloween candy” in the area of Cambridge, Ont., near Kitchener.

Coverage of Halloween candy on Globalnews.ca:

The child required hospital care, and was later transferred to another health care facility to be examined further.

An update on Friday said the 11-year-old girl had undergone surgery and remains in hospital in non-life-threatening condition.

It’s known what the source of the contamination was, but the matter is still being investigated.

“Police are encouraging the community to vigilantly examine all candy prior to consumption,” said the news release.

The police said investigators are aware that the kid had been in the Preston area, and had trick-or-treated on Montrose Street, Hamilton Street, Lowther Street, Duke Street and King Street.


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N.S. RCMP investigating report of needle in Halloween candy in Eastern Passage

There have been other reports of tainted candy in Ontario this Halloween.

In London, Ont., police say they’ve been unable to determine exactly where a child received a small chocolate bar containing a needle on Halloween night. They say the child was not injured in that incident.

Barrie, Ont., police say an 11-year-old boy received a Tootsie Roll containing a pill. They say the pill has been identified as melatonin, a supplement to counter the effects of jet lag, or help people sleep if they have an unusual work schedule or suffer from a circadian rhythm disorder.


READ MORE:
Barrie police join Chatham, London, Waterloo in reporting tampered Halloween candy

Meanwhile, police in New Brunswick are investigating incidents in Fredericton and Bathurst in which a nail and a needle were found in Halloween candy.

Anyone who finds any contaminated candy is urged to contact police.

With files from The Canadian Press

© 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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